My Life In Hell

By ROB LAMBERTS, MD (2)

“What diagnosis do you want to use for those ear drops you sent on Mr. Johnson,” Jenn texted me. “ICD-L21.8 for seborrheic dermatitis?”

Sigh. Welcome to prior-auth hell.

These are generic ear drops I ordered for presumed fungal infection of the external ear. The cash price for the drops is $15 for a 10 milliliter bottle (I checked before prescribing them). “No,” I responded, “it would be ICD-B36.9 for otomycosis.” (translation: ear fungus)

Jenn tried submitting this new diagnosis without success. She then noted that this medication was supposed to be authorized without need for authorization, so she called the pharmacist, who ran the 30 milliliter bottle through the computer system and the medication was authorized. That size bottle goes for $27 cash.

Rob bangs head on wall.

But Jenn didn’t yell. She didn’t say any profanity (that I could hear). Jenn’s a saint. She lost 30 minutes of her life to this nonsense, as did the pharmacist. As for me, I just got a little extra blood pressure points, a little acid corrosion of my stomach, and a stronger desire for beer when I get home this evening.

While my practice doesn’t accept money from insurance companies, we do serve our patients for the sake of their health. This means that we advocate on their behalf in a system that seems hell-bent on making care less accessible. Prior-auth hell is one example of this wall that has been built up between people and reasonable care. Electronic medical record hell, pharmacy trickery hell, specialist non-communication hell, bloated hospital gouging hell, media non-story hype hell, and opportunist alternative medicine hell are all contributors to the hell-fire heat we are all feeling.

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