Health Apps, Data Sharing and the Trust Deficit

By SUSANNAH FOX (16)

There has been a steady drip-drip-drip of articles documenting how health apps are sharing data with third parties:

Data sharing practices of medicines related apps and the mobile ecosystem: traffic, content, and network analysis, by Grundy et al. (British Medical Journal, Feb. 25, 2019)

Is your pregnancy app sharing your intimate data with your boss?As apps to help moms monitor their health proliferate, employers and insurers pay to keep tabs on the vast and valuable data, by Drew Harwell (Washington Post, April 10, 2019)

You Give Apps Sensitive Personal Information. Then They Tell Facebook. Wall Street Journal testing reveals how the social-media giant collects a wide range of private data from developers; ‘This is a big mess’, by Sam Schechner and Mark Secada (Wall Street Journal, Feb. 22, 2019)

Assessment of the Data Sharing and Privacy Practices of Smartphone Apps for Depression and Smoking Cessation, by Huckvale, Torous, and Larsen (JAMA Network Open, 2019)

This post is my chance to share some relevant data, add my perspective, and ask for your input.

First, the data from a 2018 Hopelab/Well Being Trust study I helped write:

  • 71% of female teens and young adults say they have tried mobile apps related to health, compared to 57% of males. Three in ten (30%) females say they currently use a health app, compared to two in ten (20%) males.
  • Fully 48% of females ages 18- to 22-years-old and 25% of teen girls say they have used a period tracking app, compared with 2% of males.
  • Sixteen percent of females use a meditation app, compared with 5% of males.

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